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>>PROPANE FACTS

  • Propane equipment and appliances are manufactured to rigorous safety standards.

  • Propane gas is nontoxic, so it's not harmful to soil and water.

  • Propane has a narrow range of flammability when compared with other petroleum products. In order to ignite, the propane/air mix must contain from 2.2 to 9.6 percent propane vapor. If the mixture contains less than 2.2 percent gas, it is too lean to burn. If it contains more than 9.6 percent, it is too rich to burn.

  • Nearly 5 million U.S. households already rely on propane for home heating and 3 million use propane for residential water heating.

  • Propane is used on more than 865,000 farms to power irrigation pumps, grain dryers, standby generators, and other equipment.

  • Propane won't ignite when combined with air unless the source of ignition reaches at least 920 degrees Fahrenheit. In contrast, gasoline will ignite when the source of ignition reaches only 430 to 500 degrees Fahrenheit.

  • Because propane is virtually odorless and colorless in its natural state, a commercial odorant is added so propane can be detected if it leaks from its container.

  • The Certified Employee Training Program (CETP) is a nationally recognized training program for people involved in the handling of propane, as well as propane equipment and appliances. CETP is used extensively throughout the country and is continually expanding and updating.

  • Each year, thousands of industry employees and firefighters attend service and safety schools sponsored by the industry. The sessions provide important training in how to quickly control and safely handle a propane emergency.

  • Propane is an approved, alternative clean fuel listed in the 1990 Clean Air Act as well as the National Energy Policy Act of 1992.

 










 

For more information about Propane Safety and emergency situations please visit www.propanesafety.com  






Propane won't ignite when combined with air unless the source of ignition reaches at least 920 degrees Fahrenheit. In contrast, gasoline will ignite when the source of ignition reaches only 430 to 500 degrees Fahrenheit.

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Propane equipment and appliances are manufactured to rigorous safety standards

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